FRAME MAGAZINE 2015 SETİ (6 SAYI)

FRAME MAGAZINE 2015 SETİ (6 SAYI)
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Frame Magazine 2015 Set / 6 Sayı (No 102-107)

 

Frame #102 Jan/Feb 2015

 

As all good things must come to an end, so must 2014. Following a year filled with milestones and openings, the first issue of 2015 celebrates another year of fresh beginnings.

As all good things must come to an end, so must 2014. Following a year filled with milestones and openings, the first issue of 2015 celebrates another year of fresh beginnings. Art director and set designer Anna Lomax visualised this annual renewal with festive images for Frame 102's cover and the Frame Labwhich is dedicated to Events. Let's get this party started!

Contents

Seeds
Innovative ideas and projects are sprouting from the fields of art, design, fashion and technology. Serbian photographer and model Ana Kraš shows her pastel skills and Martina Lasinger weaves with threads of wood. Iris van Herpen’s high tech S/S 2015 collection harnesses magnetic forces.

Harvest
Set designer Anna Lomax and photographer Jess Bonham document the results of mixing light and water while New York City’s urbanites disconnect from the concrete jungle with a pink cave by Marc Fornes and Jana Winderen.

Portraits
Miriam van der Lubbe introduces a future name in the textile development industry and Jaime Hayon talks about happiness, mistakes and open dialogue.

Features
The Frame Lab explores the many facets of events and Alexandre de Betak shares the impact of social media on his design approach for memorable affairs. Carol Lim and Humberto Leon – co-creative directors of French fashion house Kenzo – discuss their collaborations and vision for their retail venture Opening Ceremony.

Reports
The evolution and direction of furniture for the work place is analysed and a 3D printed aluminium chair by Dutch designer Joris Laarman looks to the Eiffel Tower for structural cues.

Deconstructed
OODA’s prefabricated cube gives interior spaces more function and alleviates issues facing abandoned and derelict housing in Oporto, Portugal without altering the historic structures.

 

 

Frame #103 Mar/Apr 2015

 

Colour is something of a design enigma. Few know exactly how to apply it; many don't dare to try.

For some it comes 'naturally' so it's only 'natural' that nature is the go-to source for inspiration. As materials innovation-and-technology specialist Natsai Audrey Chieza says: 'We've always borrowed from nature to dye and colour material artefacts, and that will not change.' What already is changing is the way we borrow from nature.

Contents
Seeds

Designers attempt to capture the many forms of water as well as the glow of the night. Roos Meerman crosses traditional glass blowing with technological process of 3D printing and Coralie Gourguechon forms electroics with sheets of paper.

Harvest
Guided by the power of light, Olafur Eliasson's Contact exhibition at Fondation Louis Vuitton and Jeanne Gang's glacial interpretation for Swarovski signals the reality of climate change with James Balog's photography.

Portraits
Tom Dixon takes a dip into his roots as a bassist in the 80s and their influence on his design career. GamFratesi introduces the designer to watch: Ferréol Babin from Dijon, France. 

Features
This issue's Frame Lab explores the ways creatives are experimenting in labs or farming their own pigments. Sam Bompas and Harry Parr of London studio Bompas & Parr delve into their jelly-filled adventure as experience designers.

Reports
The most viewed but overlooked part of most materials – the outside layer – receives a much deserved closer inspection. See how leading brands stay fresh by integrating design developments and technological advancements into their material finishes.

Deconstructed
The library at the National Taiwan University emerged as a forest of lotus-flower columns designed by Japanese architect Toyo Ito.

 

 

 

Frame #104 May/Jun 2015

 

 

Frame #104 analyses the retail landscape of tomorrow.

Three words say it all: tech takes over. Retail is now a hybrid of digital and physical environments. Physical stores are crossing with digital stores to offer the best from each realm, allowing us to say we are living in a phygital world.

Contents

Seeds
We go from atelier to laboratory in search of what's bubbling on the fringes of the great indoors.

Harvest
The pick of the crop: a visual feast plucked from the worlds of art and design.

Portraits
Entrepreneur, humanist and sustainability advocate, Yves Behar believes design is about questioning the status quo in order to move into the future. Swedish practice Claesson Koivisto Rune identify the designer who's grabbed their attention and Lebanese designer Najla El Zein animates the ordinary from her studio in Beirut.

Features
In this issue's Frame Lab, tech takes over as retail becomes a hybrid experience with the integration of augmented reality and social media platforms. According to Japanese designer Nosigner, the borders of professional design are shifting to bring innovation to society.

Reports
Is the outdoors the new indoors? Focused on space regardless of its boundaries, Petra Blaisse of interdisciplinary practice Inside Outside discusses her latest landscape projects. 

Deconstructed
Instead of accepting society's habits involving food waste, Isaac Monte turns out-dated meat into sculpture. Dutch duo Alissa + Nienke's process of turning steel into a lightweight dividing panels is broken down. 

 

 

Frame #105 Jul/Aug 2015

 

No better place to take the temperature of design than Milan.

Introduced as a showcase for innovative products from Italy’s furniture industry, the Salone del Mobile has evolved over a period of nearly 55 years into a global marketplace, a breeding ground for young talent, a platform for branding and – as we all know – a hotbed of discussion on and around design. But how new is the design that’s presented in Milan? 

Contents
Seeds

Alternative energies spring to life. Outdoor pieces look fit for the indoors. Furniture fattens up at the Fiera. Lighting slims down at Euroluce. Brands galore reissue classics. We reveal the most thought provoking projects and comments from Milan Design Week. 

Portraits
The stylish Ilse Crawford speaks out. Klaus Kemp inspires with the invisible. Cos reveals all about its collaboration with Snarkitecture for the Salone del Mobile. Marcel Wanders introduces Jonas Forseman. All this and more perspectives on people.

Harvest
Acne plays a home game. Nendo does it again. Maison Margiela gets theatrical in Milan. Lexus seduces with subtlety. Sonia Rykiel hits the books. Muti Randolph makes a light show for shoppers at Melissa. It’s the pick of the crop from the worlds of art and design.

Features
In this issue's Frame Lab, ten designers change the game of products: make less, think more. Lee Bul draws upon the architecture of space, mind and body to construct an exceptional version of everyday reality. Herzog & d eMeuron seduces with subtlety in Tokyo, expressing Miu Miu’s deep desire for change and self-expression.

Reports
The Palombas tackle wellness. Bette opens the doors of its German factory. Laufen, Duravit, Dornbracht and more get self-indulgent in today’s bathrooms. Soak up the business of sanitary design.

Deconstructed
Dutch initiative Label/Breed connect Christien Meindertsma and Enkev to conceive a biodegradable chair. In Barcelona, El Equipo Creativo’s tile-rich restaurant gives a modern twist to Mediterranean materials.

 

 

Frame #106 Sep/Oct 2015

 

Luxury just ain’t what it used to be. In yesteryear’s hospitality scene, the term was synonymous with private dining, champagne on ice and five-star hotels. Today, priorities have changed.

We’ve moved inward. We’re drawn to time-saving measures that accommodate our fast-paced lifestyles and uber-personalized experiences that cater to the individual. Luxury isn’t about our reputations. It’s about us.

Seeds
Designers get street smart. Art attacks an irritating phenomenon. Algae offers potential salvation. Galleries get playful. Digital and analogue merge in the classroom. All this and more is bubbling on the fringes of the great indoors.

Portraits
French studio Diplomates counteracts conservativeness. Joep van Lieshout exposes his anarchistic past. Andreas Nicholas Fischer predicts a smart-art future. The founders of Febrik make wool cool. All this and more perspectives on people.

Harvest
Wes Anderson pleases a different crowd. Kengo Kuma is all wired up. Rene Gonzalez gets materialistic in Miami. Anish Kapoor puts visitors in a spin. Armani monumentalizes itself. Artists opt for drama at the Venice Biennale. It’s the pick of the crop from the worlds of art and design.

Reports
Philips, Vibia, Lucem amd more get sculptural. Flexibility is key for Occhio, Brokis and Ilomio. Flos capitalizes on the latest LED technology. Lamps evolve into organic creatures.

 

 

Frame #107 Nov/Dec 2015

 

In the November/December issue, Material Futures, we dissect the fabric of tomorrow.

Our Harvest pages are packed with daring, bold interiors, while our Kitchens special celebrates the hub of the home. BMW’s Adrian van Hooydonk divulges where mobility is headed, and we take a critical look at e-tailers of design.

Seeds
Designers dive below sea level. Lexus lets skateboarders walk on air. Tate Britain engages the five senses. Tailoring goes digital. Synthetic biology offers potential inhalable vaccines. All this and more bubbling at the fringes of the great indoors.

Portraits
Linehouse makes modern moves in Shanghai, Alfredo Haberli relates his rise to success. Claire Morgan shows off her wild side. Brand van Egmond dramatizes with light. Hem attempts to break the e-tail curse. All this and more perspectives on people.

Harvest
Bompas & Parr gets drunk on air. Alexandre de Betak channels a church and Mad Max for Dior. Yusuke Seki constructs a pottery podium. Odile Decq revisits the '70s. Prada creates a sticky situation in-store. Toyo Ito upsizes accessories. It’s the pick of the crop from the worlds of art and design.

Frame Lab
Surfaces that respond to stimuli, surroundings that self-assemble, building blocks that reproduce themselves: materials are getting seriously smart. In this issue’s Frame LAb, we explore alchemic approaches and their chances of surviving the wider world, and uncover five directions for tomorrow’s materials.

Reports
Gaggenau cooks up a visual feast. Leicht markets itself with a physical space. Caesarstone moves beyond the countertop. Manufacturers join forces with design icons and move towards smart appliances.

 

 

 

 

 


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